14 Types of Drills That Are Relevant in 2020

Modern life, as you know it, wouldn’t be possible without drills. There are many different types of drills for all kinds of purposes, from home use to professional use.

Whether it’s filing down your nails, digging holes in the ground for your garden, making tunnels for wiring, or building something, there is a drill that can help you.

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DEWALT 20V MAX Cordless Drill / Driver Kit, Brushless,...
ENEACRO 1-1/4 Inch SDS-Plus 12.5 Amp Heavy Duty Rotary...
WEN 4214 12-Inch Variable Speed Drill Press,Orange
BLUEROCK Tools 4" Concrete Core Drill Model 4" Z-1WS...
Landworks Earth Auger Power Head Steel 6" Inch x 30"...
Makita DA3010F 4 Amp 3/8-Inch Right Angle Drill with...
Product Name
DEWALT 20V MAX Cordless Drill / Driver Kit, Brushless,...
ENEACRO 1-1/4 Inch SDS-Plus 12.5 Amp Heavy Duty Rotary...
WEN 4214 12-Inch Variable Speed Drill Press,Orange
BLUEROCK Tools 4" Concrete Core Drill Model 4" Z-1WS...
Landworks Earth Auger Power Head Steel 6" Inch x 30"...
Makita DA3010F 4 Amp 3/8-Inch Right Angle Drill with...
Weight
3.5 pounds
16.42 pounds
89 pounds
40 Pounds
32.6 pounds
4.14 pounds
Prime Status
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Picture
DEWALT 20V MAX Cordless Drill / Driver Kit, Brushless,...
Product Name
DEWALT 20V MAX Cordless Drill / Driver Kit, Brushless,...
Weight
3.5 pounds
Prime Status
Picture
ENEACRO 1-1/4 Inch SDS-Plus 12.5 Amp Heavy Duty Rotary...
Product Name
ENEACRO 1-1/4 Inch SDS-Plus 12.5 Amp Heavy Duty Rotary...
Weight
16.42 pounds
Prime Status
Picture
WEN 4214 12-Inch Variable Speed Drill Press,Orange
Product Name
WEN 4214 12-Inch Variable Speed Drill Press,Orange
Weight
89 pounds
Prime Status
Picture
BLUEROCK Tools 4" Concrete Core Drill Model 4" Z-1WS...
Product Name
BLUEROCK Tools 4" Concrete Core Drill Model 4" Z-1WS...
Weight
40 Pounds
Prime Status
-
Picture
Landworks Earth Auger Power Head Steel 6" Inch x 30"...
Product Name
Landworks Earth Auger Power Head Steel 6" Inch x 30"...
Weight
32.6 pounds
Prime Status
Picture
Makita DA3010F 4 Amp 3/8-Inch Right Angle Drill with...
Product Name
Makita DA3010F 4 Amp 3/8-Inch Right Angle Drill with...
Weight
4.14 pounds
Prime Status

So how many types of drills are there?

The answer is a lot! This guide isn’t long enough to cover them all, but keep reading to learn about ten of the most popular drills available.

1. Cordless Drill

The cordless drill is the most basic and common type of drill. It also happens to be one of the most affordable types of drills behind its corded counterpart. The cordless drill is suitable for anyone – hobbyists, DIYers, beginners, and advanced users can all easily use this drill.

While the cordless drill won’t hold up to advanced construction projects without the aid of other types of drills, it’s a tool that every contractor should have in their toolbox. It’s suitable for most general-purpose jobs, especially if you get one from the dual-speed drill category.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Power – the higher the volts, the more torque you’ll have.
  • Handle type – make sure you can grip it comfortably, and it’s not too heavy.
  • Speed – lower speed for drilling screws, higher speed for drilling holes.

Accessories

  • Backup Battery – your job doesn’t have to be interrupted to charge the battery.
  • Various drill bits – twist bits are general-purpose, dowel drill bits for wood, and titanium bits are common bits for this drill
  • Pivot holder – for drilling in tight spaces/corners.

One of the best from this category

DEWALT 20V MAX Cordless Drill DCD791D2

The budget-friendly choice

Avid Power 20V MAX Lithium Ion Cordless Drill

2. Hammer Drill

A hammer drill is a heavy-duty version of the basic cordless (or corded) drill. Instead of just spinning the bit, the drill also applies hammering action. Hammer drills are excellent for drilling through concrete and masonry.

They can also serve as general-purpose drills because most models allow you to turn the hammer off and on as you need it. There are two types of hammer drills – the demolition hammer and the rotary hammer. Of course, the demolition hammer drill is for breaking up concrete.

You can also get a drill that does both. Keep in mind that these drills are very powerful, so they aren’t recommended for beginners.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Vibration control – helps to reduce injury to joints and bones due to constant vibrating.
  • Chisel function – turns the “drilling” function off so you can use attachments best suited for hammering.
  • Brushless motor – more efficient, runs cooler, lasts longer.

Accessories

  • Chisel bits – good for breaking concrete.
  • Rebar bit – used for cutting through rebars.
  • Dust attachment – vacuums away dust as you hammer through concrete.

One of the best from this category

ENEACRO 1-1/4 Inch SDS-Plus

The budget-friendly choice

TACKLIFE 1/2-Inch Electric Hammer Drill

3. Benchtop Drill

A benchtop drill is a happy medium between a full floor press drill and a handheld drill. However, if you get a top-quality benchtop drill, the performance can rival that of a floor model. Benchtop drills aren’t meant for beginners or hobbyists.

Generally, they’re used by professionals. However, it’s not out of the realm of possibility to add one to a home collection of tools since many of them are at affordable prices.

Benchtop drills offer precision, better control, and higher productivity. A locking nut on the spindle allows you to drill the same hole over and over. You also get the benefit of saving space over a floor model.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Laser crosshairs – allows spot-on drilling in the perfect spot.
  • Handle length – the longer the handle, the more comfortable it is to press.
  • Beveling – this allows you to cut angles.

Accessories

  • Fence – can be used to make exact hole patterns
  • Clamp – securely holds whatever you’re drilling in place for precision drilling.
  • V-block – holds round dowels in place for drilling

One of the best from this category

WEN 4214 12-Inch Variable Speed Drill Press

The budget-friendly choice

WEN 434TV 4.25-Inch Industrial Strength Benchtop and Drill Press

4. Core Drill

A core drill is a cylindrical drill used to make large holes in concrete. The bit is hollow, and it drills out a “core” of material. Core drills can be used on a variety of materials with the proper bits. Examples are cement, wood, rock, and ice.

Core drills come in a variety of sizes. Smaller core drills are suitable for home projects, while mid-size drills can be used for average-sized buildings.

Large core drills are used in major construction projects like bridges or large buildings. Core drills can also be used to extract rock samples for scientific research.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Wet/Dry – wet core drills use water to reduce wear, but indoors you’ll want a dry core drill.
  • Power Source – you can choose an electric, hydraulic, or air-powered drill.
  • Handheld or Mounted – any drilling bigger than two inches may need to be mounted.

Accessories

  • Suction cup mount – anchors the drill in place.
  • Aluminum strut – also used to anchor the drill but it’s freestanding.
  • Diamond core bits – you must have this type of bit to get through concrete.

One of the best from this category

BLUEROCK Tools 4″ Concrete Core Drill

The budget-friendly choice

BLUEROCK CORE Drill 4″ Z-1 2 Speed

5. Auger

Augers are massive drills used to make holes in the ground (called earth augers). Sometimes they can be used for drilling holes in wood. For example, augers are used to drill holes into maple trees so the maple can be extracted.

These types of augers are called wood augers. Augers can be as small as a handheld drill, large enough to attach to farm equipment, or even bigger than that for major construction sites. Augers use a flighting, a helical-shaped drill bit to create holes.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Portability – smaller augers are portable. Large ones aren’t.
  • Weight – especially important with handheld augers. Stainless steel is heavier than fiberglass.
  • Power Source- some augers are mechanical, but this isn’t practical if you need to drill a lot of holes. Others are electric or gas-powered.

Accessories

  • Power drill adapter – allows the flighting to fit the chuck of an impact driver.
  • Auger teeth – placed at the tip of the auger; gets the hole stated.

One of the best from this category

Landworks Earth Auger Power Head w/Steel

The budget-friendly choice

Earthquake EA8F 8-Inch Diameter 36-Inch Long Earth Auger

6. Right Angle Drill

The head of a right-angle drill bends at a 90-degree angle. This allows you to be able to drill in inaccessible or tight spaces where your arms would otherwise not fit. Examples are corners that are awkward to reach or confined places, such as crawl spaces.

Right angle drills have very short heads and long handles, which is opposite of hand drills. Because of this, right angle drills need to be held with two hands for stability and accuracy.

When shopping for one, make sure you get on that feels comfortable in your hands since you’ll be using them both most of the time.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Trigger location – varies widely from brand to brand; make sure it’s in a comfortable spot for your hands.
  • Cord vs. Cordless – cordless is more convenient, but a corded drill has more power
  • LED light – will help you see better in difficult spots

Accessories

  • Angled drill attachment – extends your reach in the most difficult places.
  • Drill bits – can use many different types of drill bits

One of the best from this category

Makita DA3010F Right Angle Drill

The budget-friendly choice

DEWALT 20V MAX Right Angle Drill (DCD740B)

7. Impact Driver

An impact driver looks a lot like a standard drill. However, these drills are very different in terms of power. Impact drivers deliver a much higher level of torque than standard drills. They’re faster, stronger, and designed to drive in large screws through dense material.

Impact drivers deliver a hammering action, but not like hammer drills. Impact drivers essentially create and use power in the form of torque. They don’t have chucks.

Instead, they use a hex collet which is a quicker way to change bits. You must use special bits designed for impact drivers. Standard bits won’t hold up to the power of an impact driver.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Brushless motor – more efficient; battery lasts longer.
  • Variable speed – more precise drilling due to controlling speed.
  • IPM – the number of blows the driver delivers. Higher IPMs lead to faster and more comfortable driving.

Accessories

  • Ear protection – impact drivers are loud.
  • Hex bits – must be hex-shaped and specifically designed for impact drivers.

One of the best from this category

Milwaukee Hex Impact Driver

The budget-friendly choice

BLACK+DECKER 20V MAX Impact Driver Kit (BDCI20C)

8. CNC Drill

A CNC (Computer Numerical Control) is a large, floor-model drill that often performs multiple functions using CAD software. Some of these functions include drilling, milling, laser cutting, and more.

These types of drills switch functions using different drill bits. However, you don’t have to change the bits manually – they’re all pre-mounted, and when the CNC drill is given a command, it cycles to the appropriate bit for the job.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Multi-axis machines – having more than two axes lets the machine flip the workpiece automatically.
  • Single-phase or three-phase – single phase is better up to 1000 watts, and many buildings can’t handle three-phase machines.
  • DRO (Digital readout) – can be added to the axis to tell you how far you’ve moved the quill.

Accessories

  • 3D measuring probe – determines the zero point of the piece you’re working on.
  • Depth controller – ensures consistent depth for engravings.
  • Single flute cutter – used for milling soft plastics and soft aluminum.

One of the best from this category

BobsCNC E4 CNC Router Engraver Kit

The budget-friendly choice

Genmitsu CNC 3018-PRO Router Kit

9. Dental Drill

A dental drill is a small, handheld drill that is used for things like getting rid of tooth decay and or shaping teeth for different procedures. Although dental drills vary in convenient features, they all have the same four basic parts – a motor, the body/handpiece, couplings, and the drill bit.

Dental drills use an air-turbine to achieve the high speed needed for drilling. Most of them have a second motor used for slower speeds. The body of the drill is usually slender and ergonomically made so the dentist can grip it with comfort.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Fiber optic light – makes it easy to see.
  • Cooling system – keeps the drill from overheating.
  • Gear box – responsible for increasing the drill’s speed.

Accessories

  • Tungsten carbide drill bits – this is the type of bit used most of the time.
  • Handpiece flush system – cleans and lubricates drill handpieces.

One of the best from this category

Superdental MICROMOTOR SHIYANG

The budget-friendly choice

Cosy LIfe Electric Sonic Dental Calculus Remover

10. Nail Drill

One drill that gets overlooked in the world of drills is the nail drill. This drill is for cutting and shaping acrylic fingernails. When it comes to power, these drills are weak compared to the others on the list, but you don’t need the power of a hammer drill to shape nails.

Many nail drills are foot-pedal operated so that the operator can freely use their hands. With nail drills, you have the option of getting a portable, battery-powered unit, or an electric unit.

While the electric units are typically more robust, the portable ones still offer a high level of performance and are perfect for home or professional use.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Rotational speed – up to 15,000 RPM for natural nails, 25,000 RPM for acrylics.
  • Weight – something lightweight is preferable since the nail tech will be using it all day.
  • Forward/Reverse – the ability to drill in both directions means clients won’t have to bend and twist their hands in awkward positions.
  • Brushless motor – more efficient, stays cooler, fewer vibrations.

Accessories

  • Sanding bands – goes over the mandrel bit to smooth or remove acrylic nails.
  • Carbide bits – high-quality, professional bits that smooth, reshape, or remove acrylic nails.
  • Pedicure bit – used for removing calluses from feet.

One of the best from this category

AirSee Rechargeable Electric Nail Drill

The budget-friendly choice

Diyang Portable Electric Acrylic Nail Drill

11. Pneumatic drill

A pneumatic drill is similar to how a hammer drill works, but instead of consuming electricity it runs on air. They may not be as common-placed as hammer drills or battery-powered drills, but they can still perform tasks quite well.

It works like a chisel and hammer, by punching with the bit, and not by its rotation. Think of it as you would think of a hammer drill, but instead it’s operated by air. So no need to worry about plugs or batteries whatsoever.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Speed – the faster it is, the faster it can get the job done. But be aware that if it’s too fast it might lack precision
  • Product dimensions – like with all drills, the size will play a role in how you hold and handle the drill
  • Weight – again, this plays a role in how comfortable you will be able to hold the drill

Accessories

  • Drill bits
  • Replacement compressor in case the original ever gets damaged

One of the best from this category

Chicago Pneumatic Drill Reverse Pistol CP789R-26

The budget-friendly choice

DEWALT Pneumatic Drill DWMT70786L

12. Mill Drill

This is a machine that has the ability to drill both horizontally and vertically. It has a locking collet that prevents the cutting tool from falling off the table.

Mill drills are an alternative to a milling machine and it combines the best of drill presses and milling machines effortlessly. So if you’ve needed both of those for your projects up to this point, this is a good alternative for you.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Motor and Hinged Belt Cover – give the tool a range of speeds and minimize delays and wait periods as you transition to different speeds
  • Depth Gauge – an easy-to-read internal depth gauge will give you consistency no matter the project
  • 360-degree swiveling head – gives you the flexibility you need for precise results

Accessories

  • Power feeds – can completely replace the traditional gearbox shifting mechanism
  • DRO (Digital readout) – can be added to the axis to tell you how far you’ve moved the quill.

One of the best from this category

JET JMD-18 Milling and Drilling Machine

The budget-friendly choice

Proxxon 37110 Micro Mill MF 70

13. Paper Drill

This type of drill does exactly what you might think. It drills precise holes in paper. Depending upon the model, a paper drill can create one or more holes simultaneously in a stack of paper up to two inches thick.

It allows you to easily position paper and punch holes through it how you need. It’s perfect if you want to put the pieces of paper in a binder or any other similar file for papers.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Size – this will determine how many papers fit into the machine
  • Product dimensions – for determining how much space it will occupy in your office

Accessories

  • Paper guide – allows you to properly position the paper
  • Different size punch heads – allow you to create holes of different sizes

One of the best from this category

CARL Heavy Duty Paper Punch

The budget-friendly choice

General Graphic FP-1B Heavy-Duty Single Hole Paper Punch

14. Radial Drill

This type of drill press has a geared head that can be repositioned along the length of the arm, allowing you to drill holes in a straight line without having to adjust the object or machine’s position.

They have a wide range of uses in metal and woodworking shops, and have the ability to bore through iron.

Technical Specs You Should Look For:

  • Horsepower – determines the strength of the engine
  • Voltage – determines power efficiency

Accessories

  • Safety chuck guard – makes sure the chuck doesn’t take any damage if you’re drilling at fast speeds
  • Threaded depth stop – can be configured to stop at certain depths

One of the best from this category

Grizzly Industrial G9969-45″ Radial Drill Press

The budget-friendly choice

RIKON 30-140 Bench Top Radial Drill Press

Final thoughts on all types of nail drills

Drills make everything possible. Whether you’re building a birdhouse in your garage or a skyscraper, you can find the right types of drills with the right amount of power. The three most common drills on the list also happen to be the best drills in most situations.

They are the impact driver, the core drill, and the auger. All of these types of drills come in versions that are suitable for home and versions that are suited for industrial use. If you must choose, one of these three is sure to be the tool you need.

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